Sun and Spring and Green Forever
Good Cover Saturday

librar-y:

Washington, D.C., 1925.

librar-y:

Washington, D.C., 1925.

olympium:

John Martin (July 19, 1789 – February 17, 1854)

Vastness is his sphere, yet he has not lost or circumfused his genius in its space; he has chained and wielded and measured it at his will… He has penetrated the remote caverns of the past and gazed on the primeval shapes of the gone world.

Attack of the feels

So I finished the last final exams OF MY ENTIRE UNDERGRADUATE CAREER two nights ago. To celebrate my old age, we had beers at the Brunny. Talk about nostalgia! I feel like no proper UofT grad can call him or herself a veteran of this amazing/shitty/charmingly maddening university without having once gone to the Brunny, where the beers are cheap and the freshmen utterly obnoxious. I was still hit with the feels, tho. Lots of it. I can’t believe I’m…DONE. I don’t quite have the papers to prove it (official grad is not till November) but rest assured, ladies and gents, this bird is fahhhhh-reeeee! 

Now, it’s time to crawl back to good ol’ Vancouver and to make lame, grown-up decisions that will shape the rest of my sorry-ass life. CAN’T WAIT.

So my friend and I went to a (nude) life drawing class at the Gardiner Museum and I realized just how horrible I am at sketching human bodies. 

Might go to the next class, however. It was fun to knock back a few glasses of merlot and listen to house music while trying (valiantly) to capture this old, albeit very sweet, lady on paper.

So my friend and I went to a (nude) life drawing class at the Gardiner Museum and I realized just how horrible I am at sketching human bodies.

Might go to the next class, however. It was fun to knock back a few glasses of merlot and listen to house music while trying (valiantly) to capture this old, albeit very sweet, lady on paper.

Surprisingly un-fuck-upable bread for beginners:

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup warm, microwaved water (around 22 seconds, I think)
  • 1 package active dry yeast
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 cup skim milk
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour (I only ended up using 2 and 3/4 cups)

Directions:

  1. Dissolve dry yeast in a large bowl of warm water.
  2. Stir in sugar, olive oil, and skim milk.
  3. In a separate bowl, mix 2 cups of flour and salt. Then, add this to the yeast mixture.
  4. If needed, begin adding more flour, one tablespoon at a time, until the “dough chases the spoon around the bowl” (which I took for, “when it no longer looks gooey and liquid-y”).
  5. Turn dough out onto a floured and wax-papered board, adding spoonfuls of flour as needed until the dough is soft and smooth, not sticky to the touch.
  6. Put dough in greased bowl. Turn dough over so that top of dough is greased as well. Cover and let rise in warm spot for 1 hour.
  7. This shit has to have risen or else you’re screwed. But basically, after an hour, you’ll have to knead this again. And I have absolutely no idea how long kneading is supposed to take; I just kept on going until it felt sorta tough and dense. Does that make sense? Probs not.  I’m obviously not experienced enough to speak with authority on the subject.
  8. But yeah, after kneading da shit outta your dough, form it into a loaf (or at least something resembling a loaf) and place it in a greased loaf pan. Cover and let rise for about 30 minutes.
  9. Preheat oven at 375 degrees F. Use a sharp knife to make random slashes or shapes for air circulation or whatever, then put it in the oven for 30-35 minutes or until golden brown.
  10. Turn out bread and let cool on a rack or clean dishtowel. Then enjoy!!

"… he should have gone with her, all the way to the hospital. He had thrown away minutes in her company. He must learn again how to think and act for himself. He began to run along Whitehall, hoping to catch up with her at the next stop. But her bus was far ahead, and soon disappearing towards Parliament Square."

Vincent  van Gogh - From ‘Almond Blossoms’ Series (1888-1890)

Portrait of the Duke of Wellington (1812-1814) by Francisco de Goya

Portrait of the Duke of Wellington (1812-1814) by Francisco de Goya